Zelle Review: How it Works, Pros, Cons, and Benefits

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Author: Anderson Martin

Zelle has become a popular P2P payment platform praised for its speed and ease of use. But if you’re planning to use Zelle, then you probably want to know if its hype is true and whether there are any limitations to this platform.

So In this guide, we’ll be reviewing Zelle to see if it’s worthwhile. Let’s dive in.

What is Zelle, and How Does it Work?

Zelle is an easy-to-use peer-to-peer (P2P) payment processing platform that enables users to make transfers in a matter of minutes without transaction fees.

Unlike other payment services, Zelle doesn’t require account numbers to initiate their transactions. You only need a phone number and email address.

Also, transactions on the Zelle platform use the Automated Clearing House (ACH) payments system to speed up payments between U.S accounts.

How to Use Zelle?

To Make Payments 

To send money with Zelle, you’ll only need the phone number and email address of the person you’re sending the money to. 

After you authorize the transfer, the recipient will receive a message saying that money is waiting for them. If the recipient has a Zelle account, the money goes directly to their bank account.

To Receive Money

To receive money with Zelle, the sender only needs your phone number and email address. If the sender starts the transaction and you aren’t enrolled with Zelle, you will receive a message explaining how to receive your funds.

Is Zelle Safe?

Generally, Zelle is considered a safe and secure way to transfer money. However, this payment method isn’t completely risk-free.

Zelle transactions are considered safe because they don’t require you to share any sensitive financial information.

However, Zelle doesn’t have the fraud payment protections that we have come to expect from credit and debit cards. This means that if you make an online purchase through Zelle, there’s no way to get a refund if you never receive your item.

Once payment has been authorized on the Zelle platform, it cannot be reversed. The only way to get your money back is if the recipient isn’t registered on Zelle.

Although Zelle possesses monitoring and authentication features for fraud, it doesn’t require two-factor authorization for person-to-person transactions.

For these reasons, you should never use Zelle to make transactions with online sellers and people you don’t know properly. Also, ensure to input the correct mobile number and email address of the person you want to send it to (or you risk losing the money).

What Banks Use Zelle?

Zelle is jointly owned by several of the biggest banks in America which include Capital One, PNC Bank, JPMorgan Chase, U.S. Bank, Wells Fargo, Bank of America, and Truist. 

Created by banks for banks, they aim to provide financial institutions of all sizes with digital payment features that work well for both the customer and the bank.

The list of banks and credit unions that have adopted Zelle is continually increasing. In 2021, nearly 10,000 banks and credit unions across the U.S were part of the Zelle network.

Zelle Pros

  • Zelle is free to download and doesn’t charge transaction fees to send and receive money.
  • Zelle is a good transfer payment option due to its transfer speed. In most cases, those who use Zelle can receive a money transfer within minutes.
  • With Zelle, you can make money transfers without sensitive financial information on both parties. All that’s needed is the phone number and email address.

Zelle Cons

  • One of the biggest issues with Zelle is its lack of fraud protection. Zelle doesn’t protect its users if they get scammed.
  • Zelle only supports U.S-based banks, so it can’t be used for international transactions.
  • Another issue with Zelle is that you cannot cancel a payment unless the recipient isn’t yet on the Zelle network.

Conclusion

Zelle is a super-fast, super-convenient payment processing platform. However, Zelle is meant to be used between friends, family, and trusted ones. So to avoid losing your money, never use Zelle to pay for a product or service.

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